Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
natiF. | Functional Wellness
natiF. | Functional Wellness

Episode 3 · 1 year ago

Q&A with Feng Shui Specialist and Holistic Home Designer Marissa Lada

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marissa is a holistic home designer. Utilizing her background in the Interior Design industry and her knowledge as a Feng Shui Consultant and energy worker, she focuses on creating a holistic approach to our homes.

Being highly sensitive to her environment, she understands the power a space can have on our mental, emotional, and physical health. With her holistic design approach, she helps people improve the relationship they have with their space to create happier and healthier connections.

In this episode, Marissa and I discuss how the spaces we live in contribute to our overall health and wellness, the benefits of incorporating the elements of Feng Shui into your home; and how to live more sustainably. 

Hi and welcome to native where I discussed with the experts how to feel better, live better and do better in your everyday life. So, Hey guys, I'm here with Marissa and Marissa is a functional home designer and it's actually a pretty funny story how we met. So I was actually on tick talk one night and I was just scrolling through and I saw one of her I guess, her viral tick talk that went around, and she was talking about how the spaces that were in effect their health and the effects our energy and she wants to design to kind of work with that and kind of play that up rather than just focusing on the esthetics of how things look. She'll explain it better than I do, but after I saw I tick talk, I was like wow, that's really cool, so I sent her a message and now now we're here. Yeah, so just to, I guess, further elaborate on that. So, yeah, I focus on creating happier and healthier spaces and really focusing on the relationship that the people are, whoever's living in that space, have with their space because, like tiffany was saying, it's more than just the esthetics. The esthetics can greatly impact us, but there's so many other things, like the energy of a space and the even health of a space, what we're putting into our spaces, that impact us on such subconscious levels that, you know, we may not be conscious of it, but they do still affect us. Yeah, you said it perfectly so in your tech talk you mentioned that, starting from a young aide, you've always been spectly sensitive to spaces and sensitive to the environment, and I was wondering if you can just discuss a little bit more about what you meant by that. Yeah, so I am an empath and, for those who don't know, that's just someone who's very highly sensitive to emotions and just, I guess, really highly sensitive. So not only was I really sensitive to people, but also my spaces. So I would go into spaces and just get, you know, very emotionally influenced by them, both positive and negative, a lot of times, I would say, the ones that leave the impact or the negative feelings you get in spaces. And there were just certain spaces that, you know, they weren't like, I don't know, they didn't have bad history to them per se. It wasn't like it was a haunted house or prison or something like drastic, but it was just there was something that impacted me so much and that's what influenced me to create spaces. was just I'm very highly sensitive of to my environments. Kind of actually right now, being in the city during shutdown and covid like, even though I'm still living at where I am living and I love my space like I can I can feel the energies of just everyone in their spaces and kind of that stressed out energy. So that's kind of how, you know, growing up I was very influenced by spaces and I didn't really understand why. I just knew that there were spaces I liked and there were spaces I didn't like. And it's not that I couldn't enjoy I couldn't really be in the spaces I didn't like. Some people can kind of be like that's not the best for me, but for me I was like I had a very emotional reaction to those oh that's so interesting to rere like I got to get out of here. Yeah, like, for example, my my Grandpa, and maybe this is like an extreme case, but he was a hoarder. So whenever we would go by their house, I would be so like adamant. I would I would try to avoid like going to my grandparents house at all costs because it was just like being in that environment for so long caused me such like anxiety, it cost me stressed, it was just uncomfortable for me. I didn't enjoy going there. So, and I know that's an extreme case because hoarders are like, you know, there's piles of stuff everywhere. But you know, for other people like my mom or my sister, they could, they would be okay with it, but for me it was like such a reaction. Yeah, wow, that's that's really interesting. So, yeah, I've never known anyone that's a horder, but I can imagine that it's not pleasant to be yeah, that's I mean, and I mean interesting because, like I focus on so many things being connected and granted, like you know, my my grandfather was a classified order and it's actually something that, according the psychologist, is something that's hereditary in some way. It's like it is a mental illness, but that can be passed down. So I've noticed, like...

...my mom has some tendencies and I personally do. It's like, you know, that is extreme, but it's something that's just like okay. I'm aware of. I like to collect stuff and maybe that's why I'm so into, you know, decor and objects and things, because I like that and orders do to apparently. Wow, that's so injoy. I didn't know that. About it being hereditary. Yeah, it's like, I don't because that makes it sound like it's some biological thing, but I think it's just like you know what environments you're raised in. You kind of get that. You know, nature verse nurture, for sure. So going back to Covid, so you were telling me that you started your business kind of around the covid time. So when you talk a little bit more about kind of how you decided to go off on your own and what differs between Your Business and, I guess, another interior design firm? Yeah, so having my own business was always something kind of in the back of my mind just because I knew I had this very unique way of looking at spaces that I just didn't really come across in the places I had worked. But it was something that I was always hesitant to jump on board because starting your own business can be scary. There's so like they just don't tell you, really they don't teach you these things so it was something that I always wanted to do, but I just wouldn't say had the courage or like was pushed into it. And with Covid, it kind of did push me into it because I was let go of the place I was working at because of Covid and they just, you know, cut a bunch of people and I was one of them and it made me kind of realize like, okay, well, I could, you know, get another job working at another firm and, you know, not really feel satisfied, or I can take this opportunity to start my own thing with the time and just, you know, it kind of felt right in a way, even though it's a crazy time to start a business. But yeah, that's why I decided to start it because of this. It was kind of like this opportunity fell into my lap and I decided to take it. And how I differ from a lot of other firms, actually I don't really know any other firms that do this, is that I do look at spaces and a holistic lens. A lot of traditional design firms will look at spaces is just a visual or I mean there is some function lity and like how does this kitchen work? And what's you know, how is this layout? But there's a there's a lot of different types of design firms out there and I just didn't see any that really focused on more of these holistic views that I'm passionate about, which is how do our spaces and pact us, how to our spaces impact the environment, because there's so much waste and comes like in the design industry to it's a lot of based on trends and just like kind of constantly revamping. So I didn't see a lot of that happening where it was like, you know, really focused on the person. And I get sometimes in design is like, you know, there's some designers that have their own esthetic and it's like you'll pay to have that look in your space. But, you know, I've never really was a fan of trends. I feel like people have their own preferences and their own tastes and I wanted to design for them but do it in a very conscious way to or it's like I'm not only making your space, you know, stetically pleasing and something you love to look at, but I want it to be something you feel good in too. Since I am very emotionally sensitive to my environments. I wanted that to kind of portray to my clients, to even if they're not as sensitive as I am. MMM. So, other than the lack of holism and, I guess that emphasis on Esthetics, was there anything else that you were unhappy with or wanted to change about the the industry? Yeah, I mean a lot of it there. There is a lot, and I would say the two biggest things in my mind are one is like a lot of it is focused on trends, which, like, I understand. I mean that's how the economy keep circulating. I mean there's trends and fashion and there's trends and design, but there's so much revolved around, yeah, the trends and, you know, constantly redoing and I think it was just more focused on the money aspect of the industry, like one, the constant waste that trends produce, because you're always feeling like you have to, you know, keep up with the Joneses, as they say, and keep remodeling and keep revamping, even if you have a perfectly functional space that you enjoy, or you know, feeling also like you have to spend so much money in order to have a space you love, which is a huge misconception in interior...

...design is that you have to spend a lot of money. So those were some of the things that I was unhappy about in the industry and always trying to find like the most cost sleep solution, even though, and that's I think one of the misconceptions, is that you know, you have to spend a lot of money, of course, because that's what designers are telling you. You have to do this way, when you can do something really simple and have it be very beautiful and functional. But you know, I get it. It's not what you know. These larger firms have this huge overhead and have to support people. So that's I think my focus is like, you know, we can do things and you know, more cost effective solutions. Yeah, that's really interesting. So I guess my next question would be what kind of services you offer if you're, I guess, not designing for an esthetic or trend and you're not looking to really like got those expensive jobs. Yeah, so the misconceptions. Yeah, I'm sorry because you repeat the question. Oh yeah, so basically, like you're talking about some of the misconception about cost and I guess like designing for trends and stuff or not the misconception, but the focus on designing for trends. My question is kind of if you're not fitting into this mold of what the industry is, then what are the other types of services that are you that you're offering? Sorry, no, that's all right, will distracted by a dog. So a lot of things I offer that I would say it different is they're still focused on the home, but they're not in the traditional way. So, since a lot of the design industry is focused on trends, they will be, you know, finding you need this new piece of this New Sofa, or like you need to like change the whole layout of your bathroom, and I totally understand sometimes and some situations that does make sense. You know, if you have like some couch that's falling apart and it's like okay, let's, you know, get a new one. If it can't be salvage you're fixed. Or yeah, your space just isn't really efficient and you know you could have a totally better layout. But I focus on things to aside from those is still offer those services, but I focus to on other, you know, ways that you can have a better space. So whether that's through organizing and decluttering a lot of times. I want to say that that can be solved with we US humans collect so much stuff. So that's a you know, an easier, more cost effective way to have a better space is like, you know, just declutter and purge and organize. A lot of people don't, though, because it isn't overwhelming task and we have sentimental attachments to our to our things. You know, talking about horders recently. That's totally the case. So I focus on almost being like your house therapist in some ways, of like talking through and because it is a huge emotional attachment for some people to let go of stuff. So it's kind of, you know, walking them through a process, just like any therapist or a life coach or, you know, some you know, personal trainer. It's like you can totally do this on your your own, but that's often times why a lot of it doesn't get done. Is Like, you know, Oh, I could organize, but I don't even know where to begin, or I don't you know, I feel so overwhelmed. So that's a service that I offer and then just coming up with other cost effective solutions. So, you know, I'm big into thrifting because I think there's so much waste in our in our world, and like all these products that people just, you know, give to the thrift store. So I focus on like let's give that a new life. If you really want to, you know, bring in new stuff into your space, you don't have to spend a hundred and fifty dollars on, you know, a side table. We can go to thrift store and refurbish or repurpose something or even something you have. A lot of people don't have the I can't see the potential and what they already have. They think they need something new, where I will come in and use like my background, in my experience bee like no, this is perfectly fine, or like how about we do this and come up with these creative solutions that are saving, you know, a piece of furniture and object from ending up in a landfill and it's saving the client money. And then it's this beautiful story too with your pieces of like this used to be this like side table and now it's, you know, whatever we've turned it into, even if it's still a side table, it has a new life to it. So those are some services that I would say a little unique, as well as just the holistic kind of gus I bring on my in my work, especially to...

...with me being certified as a funch way consultant. Perfect. So that leads me right into my next question for you is you're talking a lot about holistic home design and I was just wondering what does that mean to you and, moreover, how does the way our space is design affect our overall health? Like, I guess, what is the purpose of holistic home designer? Why? Why is this the thing? Yeah, and and it's interesting well, because I don't even know if there is another designer that terms themselves that this. This is one thing that I just came up with because I am into holistic, like a holistic way of looking at things. I'm int holistic health and seeing how our bodies and everything is connected. So our spaces are almost like an extension of that, just because we spend so much time in it and we have so much of our things and even the food that we've, like everything is in our houses. It's like one of our most basic needs. So that's kind of why I turned myself as a holistic home designer, because I could see how our spaces affect us on all of the levels, on a physical, on a mental and an emotional on an energetic and I mean just for an example, like, you know, our spaces, if we live in a spay, or like even our lighting, if we're having something like for us in lighting, can affect how we're sleeping. It can affect our circadian rhythm. And you know, that's why a lot of you may hear people, especially functuate consultants, be like don't put your TV in your bedroom because having your TV, you're like looking at your screen for so long, can affect our sleep. So that's how it affect one way is it affects our physical how it affects our our mental? You know, if we have a cluttered space, studies have shown that it actually decreases our productivity. It makes us more stressed, we're even less likely to do things like work out or feel less social because we're so selfconscious of our spaces. If that's how it kind of affects us in some mental and emotional levels, and I mean emotional, I would say has a lot to do. That's one of the things I will say that interior design, and in like the traditional sense, does because you look at something and you can be like, Oh, the space makes me feel like I love being in the space. You may not know why, but you'll find this attraction of like I love this coffee shop or I love my bedroom or I love this walk like wall color. So I would say that, you know, overall, a lot of times people will see the emotional benefits of a space, but not the physical, not the mental, and even not like the energetic, because I mean that's where the functuate comes in as how our spaces actually do impact us on very subtle energetic levels. Another example is in Functua. If you know someone wants to attract a partner into their life, I will look at their space and see how your space is actually set up to allow that. So in your bedroom, if your bed is in the corner and you only have one night stand, it's like you're not it doesn't really feel like you're actually bringing in that energy or that energy is created for your partner. Like one of the solutions for that is actually placing your bedroom in the center or the bed in the center of the room and having two knife stands, because then you're actually making this energetic space for this new person to enter your life. So there's things like that that a an energetic level can impact us. You know, we may not be thinking of like Oh, how does our how does my space impact my love life, but it can. So that's kind of where I view the or bring in this holistic way of looking at things. Is whatever a client needs, I can like sense, okay, well, this is how it's impacting maybe their mental state, or this is like the physical things that they're having issues with, and then just bringing in, you know, my backgrounds in both function and into your design, as well as my other interests in sustainability and energy work and all of that. So the holistic that's, I guess, where it comes from. Wow, that know, that's that's super interesting and I feel like as a society, when we think about how we think of it as a very from internal thing, and I think that you offer a really fresh perspective because you're like, oh well, no, wait, like our environment also plays into our health. It's not just this internal manifestation. There's this kind of two way movement totally and I think more there been more studies to show. But I mean even like we, if we really take the time to think about it, we can tell how our spaces impact us, like even right now, with us all being, you know, locked inside our spaces. I'm sure we're experiencing that...

...now. Oh for sure. I think that now it is just like a reinforcement. And the bed things so interesting. I never knew that before, but now that I think of it, like I know kids and people in university. They all have their beds up against the wall, but you never see, I guess, the adults, for married couples, doing that makes a lot of sense actually. Yeah, and I mean as for it kid, it actually makes sense to push it more in the corner because that's like it's a very protective kind of energy of like I'm in a corner, I'm protected, I like, you know, safe. It's very cozy where. Yeah, and a relationship, it's like I want there to be equal. So, like you get a nightstand, you get a nightstand. Like I feel like over right now. But yeah, like just more of that energy where they're. I mean, this is the thing. I don't want to like say what I do isn't as so simple, but like oftentimes the most, you know, best things for us are the most simple. We've just for some reason like lost that disconnection. Yeah, and I think it takes someone else to come in to kind of just show us and be like, Oh, well, this was here all along, but we just didn't see it. Yeah, and that's like what I like to do because, I mean, everyone is different and unique, and that's what it's like, trying to figure out how how to better the relationship people have with their spaces and to make it more harmonious, because, I mean, that's a big thing in Functui, is for everything to be in balance. Okay, so you you talking about Functui. So for those of us that don't know, to be honest, I know you much nothing about it, but what is functui and can you briefly describe kind of how the elements and how she play into, I guess, Functui as a whole, just if you can give us a recap or the smart concursion? Yeah, I mean it is. I would say there's a lot of misconceptions about Functui as well. So not only am I like trying to educate people on Interior design, but I'm also trying to educate people on Functui, which can be a challenge because it's like, yeah, I'm taking these huge aspects and, you know, trying to educate, which is something I do want to do, but with Functua. So there is the the reason why I think there's a misconception is because there's so there's many different types of Funcui and they're not really classified. So it's like when you look on Google or when you look in a FUNCTUI book, they're not telling you which school they're actually talking about, which is why you'll get so much misinformation and like this school it's done this way and this school it's done that way, and when you read a book you're like wait, I thought it was this way, and like it's just really talking about a different school. So functui is actually a two five hundred year old practice coming from China and it stems from Taoism, which is a Chinese philosophy as well as the religion, and in Daoism it really focuses on having everything being harmony with one another. This is what's called, you know, the Dow or the way, and Functui focuses on doing that through our spaces and our environment. So with Functui, you mentioned she. So she is actually the term. Well, it is the term for energy, but in China there's actually like thirty different ways of using Chi. It's like you know what's the Chi of the the weather, or like your own Chi, or the she of a space, or you know, the she of your food, like because everything is out of your g so that's why it gets so much you know, different descriptions. So yeah, for the simplest terms, is like she has energy. So that's when you know we're talking about in FUNCTUI. We use she and just think about it as energy or vibrations or frequency or prawn or whatever other way you like to just describe energy. And she actually is influenced or like one of the ways for a functuality designer, especially because I had practiced the form school, which is the classical Functui, so it's the oldest and the original. So in my school of training we have the five elements and these all have their own different Chi to them. So the five elements are different because in the West we have our four, but in China they have five and those are water, wood, earth, metal and fire. And the focus is they're all around us, like we have all of these five elements within us and our spaces have all these five elements. So there tends to be in balance, just you know, because we have usually a...

...dominant and one that we're like the weakest, and so the point is to bring all of these Um to be balanced and harmonious with one another. So that's why you may hear in functual it's like Oh, ad add would she to your space, or like you need to reduce the metal sheet, and they're talking about like the energy that's the strongest in that air or the weakest. And you know how we are using you know the how we're describing it, I guess. So there's looking at in the space, but then it's also looking at it in ourselves because, like I was saying, we have all of these elements within US and usually we have a dominant and a recessive. So whatever our dominant is, we are going to want to have that in our space, because it's this the element that we are the most familiar with, since we have the most of it. So that's the way we can connect better to our spaces, if we have more of the element that we have in our space. But since the point of functuate is to have everything be harmonious, we also want to include the thing that we're the element where the weakest end, since we need to like raise up that she within us. So we need to put that Che in our space. So does that? I know they're like there's so much about Functua, and I mean at some point I would love to write a book about just like explaining this or just doing more doing classes, because, yeah, there's a lot that goes into it and I feel like functuis just this cool holistic way of looking at spaces to because you're talking in terms of energy. Yeah, for sure. So sorry, I'm something on in the background. Yeah, I know that definitely gives me a better idea of what's going on, but kind of my next question is what kind of drew you to functional or I guess what was attractive about it for you, and I guess you kind of went over it, but I was wondering why you think that people should, like, why do you think that they should keep these functuary principles in mind when they're designing their home or like why does like you're saying, Oh, I might mean more fire, but what does needing more fire mean to me in my life? Yeah, so, yeah, I it's hard to figure out when I was actually attracted to functional. I mean I can tell you like, oh, this is when like probably more so, but I think I always had this subtle interested just didn't know it. As a kid I was super into a lot of Chinese kind of like culture and functual was something that I was interested as like a very little kid, but didn't really know anything about. I was reading these books that were just like you know, the ones that are full of misconception. So I was always confused about like what is function exactly? It's cool, but I don't know anything about it. So something I always drew me to it. But then I was more into into your design, I think, and you know, just kind of being in the West and that's just it seemed like, okay, this is the steps you take going to college, getting your interior design degree and that it wasn't until after I got that and then started to have to search for jobs. And know at that time it was very difficult to find job. I'm sure it still is, but like it was very hard for me to get my foot in the door in the industry. So I started working at a metaphysical book shot and this is how I got into energy work, because I like crystals were the first thing I started to learn about and was so fascinated by them, and that like open my mind up to all this other stuff with with energy and meditation and Yoga and Taro and all of this, and functuated was one of those things, because at first, when I got interested in like the metaphysics and energy and the esoteric, it's like, oh my gosh, like, I love design, but man, now I want to be like a yoga teacher or like a reiki master or someone who's into like energy. And was like what? Like I just got my degree and like, oh my gosh, what am I doing? And I was really trying to blend the two, because I still loved interior design and I love spaces, but I didn't know how to merge those until I found out about FUNCTUI and I was like that's that's perfect, that's what I that's what I need to do, because it was focused on the energy of spaces and it was like, oh my gosh, that's just so aligned. So that's how I got interested in Funcui and then just started to do a lot of self research. But then I really learned the most when I did get certified through my school, and I continue to learn about this because, yeah, just with it being twenty five hundred years old. There's always like there's just so much knowledge there. Yeah, but then you were mentioning how you know, like you're saying, how do we incorporate functuation into our spaces, especially talking about these...

...certain elements. So one of the things you're mentioning like, yeah, if you have a lot of fire, how is that look in your space? So in functuate, and especially in the form school, there's a lot of like metaphors or analogies or symbolism that's thrown around. So when we're talking about fire, it's like, you know, you could put a physical fire like candles or a fireplace or something like that, but a lot of times this energy just comes across in different ways. So, for example, if you do have a lot of fire and you need to like want to put that in your space, actually, I'll rewind and I'll backtrack, is as much as you're putting it into your space, you have to kind of realize like how what your g is and how that comes across. So, like, for a person with a lot of fire in them or a lot of fire cheat, they will probably be very passionate and very social. That like fire, are the types that will go out and they're super charming and magnetic and they're like the life of the party, usually extroverts. So they have this like warmth about them and they're super just like almost I'm trying to think, like just thinking of that person that's just like wow, so magnetic and like charismatic and grageous and the leader, and so that's kind of like fire there, super bubbly, and so that's, you know, the fire type. But then how that gets brought into our spaces as we do look at the energy of that person. So like, since fire usually like to stand out and be unique and be like look at me, and you know, having a space like that, you know, fire spaces usually are very eccentric or they have like some quirky aspects to them. That's just like wow, that's a statement, because firelights to be seen. So having a space that's very, very showy, and I would say it look sometimes even on trends, because it's like wow, you have like such as create a magnetic space, and that's one way, but the other like, say, if it's just like Oh, we need to increase your fire or you know, maybe you're having water your main element is water and you need to actually increase or fire. There's so many ways to go about adding these functuate heires into your space. So for fire and for all of the elements there there is a like certain colors that are associated with it. There are certain objects, there are certain materials, there are certain even like lines and patterns and shapes. So like bringing those in through through so many ways. So for fire it's like the colors that are associated with fire are reds oranges, like thinking of warm colors pretty much, or very primary or like heavy saturated colors. So those would be colors. For Lines, it's just a lot of angles, like the hexagon, or not hexagon, the herringbone patterns, Zig Zags, the arrows, because when we look at to the the elements, they're even broken down like some like further in terms of Yin or young energy. So fire is very young and young is very active and fast moving and engaging and dramatic. So looking at a lot of these shapes, to like triangles and zigzags and dashes like that's very stimulating patterns. So putting those into your space another way to do that is, like I was saying, through these cures. So actual physical objects, so like candles would be a good one, having a fireplace that's lit, things like that. So they're, like I said, are so many ways you can go about it and really, when I'm working with the client, it's trying to find the ways that work best for them, because not everyone is going to be like yeah, I'm totally down for painting my room red, like we can find other ways that is like, oh, but yeah, I can put a few candles or oh, I can do this like certain pattern that work for them. So in this case, why are you making the suggestions? Is it because if they're dominant in that element, that's just what they're going to prefer, or it's something not like to maintain balance internally. So there's I mean with Functua, there's so many like ways you can go back. I think that's why I really liked it because, you know, considering like I consider myself a healer and I don't like throwing around that term a lot because it's like, you know, we can do our own self healing, but it's like I want to help facilitate that. So with Functua, the thing I really liked about it was you can create and solve so many problems in your life with Functua. So that's kind of why I use the suggestions, and it is really based...

...on the person's needs or what's going on in their life. So you know whether that is like, okay, we need to add this element because you know you're weak in it, or Oh, you want to manifest or like attract, you know, wealth, for example. Okay, well, let's look at what elements you can like either improve or you have too much of than your space. That's impacting it. So it is really a case by case basis with what I'm suggesting. But, like, giving these cures is based on, you know, those certain needs that people are coming to me for, and then just giving them a list also helps empower because, you know, again with with you know, considering her the healers, it's like you're helping, it's like whoever the healer is or whatever is is doing, is helping facilitate, but you're the one who's actually making those decisions and choices. So it's like having a list of cures that client can choose from helps them to say, like this is what I'm going to be, like, this is what works for me, which I think is important, because only you really know what works for you in the end. Well, let's that's that's so funny to think about. Like other designers come and be like Ala, do you like this tyler, this tile, and you're like what problems are going on in your lag? Yeah, I do like the the selections. Selections of those really actually makes me excited. Is the that sort of thing, because, I mean, I'm interested in psychology, to which is like another lens I bring into my design practice. Is, how is this color affect us? How does like everything in our space affect us? So I enjoy both. But yeah, what I really enjoy is like the emotional reactions people get afterwards. Is Like, oh my gosh, like I've attracted this or I've done this, or I love where I'm at now. Like that's what brings me the most joy, is like having people actually enjoy where they are. Yeah, that must just make it so much more meaningful. It totally does. Like, yeah, I would say, I. Yeah. So, okay, so I kind of wanted to get into a little bit of psychology here. So in your tech talk you're talking about why people are drawn to the cottage court design trend. So just wondering what ruled is nature play in holistic design and why do we use humans? Kind of keep buying yourselves gravitating to this. I guess it's not really an aesthetic an Athy. Yeah, yeah, I mean I found this really fascinating when I first learned about it, and I guess there are many ways to look at it, like, I mean one in functual. Actually, they do talk about there is this connection with nature. I mean you like see it in the five elements and how that they're in nature. But you know, we as humans, from like an evolutionary standpoint, actually prefer natural spaces. It's just how we evolved. It wasn't until, you know, a couple hundred years ago that we started to become more urbanized. In the more urbanized we got, you know, the less nature took part in these spaces and we started to disconnect. And there have been so many studies that have shown how nature actually impacts us on so many levels, which, I mean nature has been a big thing that I incorporated into my design because I have felt the positive effects of the natural environment, like I you know, having my own things with some like, you know, problems or tough times in my life. You know, nature is really helped me get through that and brought me some peace of mind and clear dirty. So with us as like you know how that plays into holistic design. That's just another way of like how nature actually does help heal us. So they're starting to look at this a little more in in the actual architect and design industry, which is where I discovered it. But the fact is, like I don't know if enough firms are doing this, which is crazy because it is so important and there's been so many studies that show, like, you know, adding plants can improve your like improve your mood, lower your stress, actually purify the air, like all of these things that help us with our health or like having access to natural light can increase our predictivity and help us feel more creative, like all of these things that impact as I mean, and this is this isn't new. Like again, we've always been drawn toward nature. It's just, you know, now we're looking at it through a psycho psychological lens and like Oh yeah, nature does impact us in our health and it's like well, yeah, done. So other other, you know, ways of looking at like I said, function. I've known this first centuries and you know, so the...

West is a little slow to catch up, but that's why, at least I believe, we're attracted to these types of esthetics or like having more house plants in our space or having more natural wood in our space, or this cottage cord to go to core, which like feels very like I'm out in the country, because we just naturally prefer that. I mean like even now living in the city. I mean, and I live in Seattle, where it's pretty nature, but you know, feeling the stress of city living like, you know, going out in nature actually just as a little you know, if anyone wants to do this, just thinking about like a space that brings you absolute peace, like ninety nine out of a hundred percent, or ninety nine times out of a hundred, it's going to be some some natural scene, whether it be like an ocean side, a mountaintop, like some some natural setting is going to be peaceful. It's not like who the bustling city like, unless maybe it is for you, maybe you're the one percent. But you know, that just shows how we just prefer nature so much. Yeah, it's interesting too that it's not even really is some people thing. It's like a almost everybody think. Yeah, even if you consider yourself like a city person, I still think there are certain elements that you know are kind of natural, but you may not think about it, like having access to a view, like, you know, we don't want to be in a cinder block prison cell. Like. These things actually do impact our health, like having natural lighting and packs are our sleep and our moods. You know, that's why a lot of people, when they're under fluorescent lights at their work that can get headaches and things like that, because it's just not natural. Yeah, yeah, for sure. I feel that in my work to and even just looking at a screen all day and not, I guess, looking anywhere else, like not looking at a view or not, I guess, even like looking around the room that much. Yeah, and this is like, I think for me, I mean just being very insensitive to spaces, this is like very important for me to have a space those like I have views. I can see some greenery outside my window, like because I knew that just being extra sensitive and impacted me a lot more so. Yeah, and doing the whole nine hundred twenty five were in you're like looking at a screen twenty one seven. It's just like it's a lot, but there are ways, I think, you know, as we develop as a more technological society, like we're starting to bring back nature, for example. Like, you know, I look at my screen, you know, a lot for my job too. But something you can do is actually like what Your Walt what your desktop wall paper is like, having a natural like a landscape view of nature or some nature element can actually to like help us. So doing subtle things like that where it's like, maybe you're not living out in the country, but you can still bring this natural just like nature into our lives. Yeah, that's actually really interesting. I always offer my own dusk talk to be like either like a sky or water, something like that. Yeah, and I think maybe companies noticed too, because a lot of companies will have like those natural yeah, the deal you faults. So yeah, but just to like reiterate that to people who maybe aren't aware of this, it's like, yeah, we preferre natural settings or sceneries, you know. Yeah, even if we're not a nature person at heart. Yeah, that's so true. So my next question would be kind of on the theme of like adapting to our circumstances. What are some tips you that you have off the top of your head, for improving the energy of the space, that someone could do like right now and with little to no cost. So there's actually, I mean I wouldn't say there's a whole, but but there there are some, because I think the big I mean getting into this when I was like at in college and out of college, I didn't have the money to necessarily redesign or do all this crazy stuff to my space, so I had to be very like financial with it. So certain things that I would say can drastically improve your living situation. One would be decluttering, because that is something that is like that can actually like make you money if you're selling your stuff. But you know, we as humans, like I said, just to have this natural tendency to fill spaces. It's like our objects are comforting to us. We can see them as a sign of value or like monetary status. But and and generally, like, whatever size space we have, we're going to want to fill it. But that can just...

...keep on growing and growing and growing to the point where it's like wow, I have a lot of stuff, maybe not to the horder level, but you have a lot more stuff than you need or you just aren't like properly organizing it, like your your clothes are on the floor and your dishes are in the sink and things like that. So as much as we're taking care of our physical bodies, are, you know, doing a lot of stuff for our our our health. You know, we think of our bodies and like okay, I'm going to do like, you know, meditation twice a day, or I'm going to go exercise or I'm going to eat healthy, like we need to have healthy routines for our spaces. To that being, I'm going to do the dishes like right when I'm done eating, or I'm going to make the bed in the morning, because these things impact us too. So that's something that someone can easily do. Is like having a home routine almost. It's like, you know, kind of getting into that flow. Another thing that we can do that's super low cost, not any is rearranging our furniture. A lot of times, like you know, I think we as humans too, and maybe more so in the west, like like this sense of newness, and that's why I think trends are so popular, as well as like, Oh, I want that new thing or I need this new thing, when, you know, simply rearranging your your furniture can make your space feel totally different and totally new. So that's something I constantly do in my space. Is Because, I mean, I like doing it, but it just does help to make things feel fresh. It actually does move around the Che when you rearrange furniture, so you are moving around the energy to help things feel better. Other things that people can do that are little to no cost. There are other tips I would say. Like, I mean, I that's why I like thrifting, is because it's generally cheaper than you know, getting stuff from a back store. I mean that will cost you something, but you can be really creative with the things in your space. But the two big ones I would say are like getting into a healthy habit of doing, you know, maintenance on your in your space, like, you know, putting stuff away and keeping things are organized and decluttering, and then just rearranging your furniture. And then, you know, later on there could be other like small enhancements you can do, like, you know, swapping out pictures or very low costs. That can make a huge impact, or being creative with diyse, if that's something you're into. Those are other ways you can save money to got those are those are interesting, speaking of which I have dishes in my saying. It's I mean, just like with anything, it's a hard, you know, thing to it's a habit that we have to get in to. Like, yeah, people who want to like lose weight or or, you know, work out. It's you're not going to run a marathon in one night. You have to kind of build up toward it. Yeah, that's an interesting way to put a I feel like you and no, probably better than anyone else. But when it comes to you our guys decluttering and get her getting rid of things. I've heard different like rules of thumb, like Oh, if you haven't used it in a year, then you need to get rid of it. Do you have kind of a rule of thumb for that, or it just depends on the individual piece? Yeah, I mean this is there's like two categories, I would say, that like our objects fall into, and one is the functionality of it, and then too is the sentimental value, which is like people will get stuck on the sentimental value, I would say. But yeah, like those things of if I haven't used it in like over a year, and that's I think a big thing is like people like that. I'M gonna I'M gonna at some point like okay, if you haven't used it in this amount of time, like I don't know if anything's going to change. It's always the potential, but it usually is never the case. So that's something I suggest. Another thing is like do you have multiple things of the like multiple quantities of the same objects? So it's like why do I need five scissors in my house? Like you don't need one in every single room or things like that. So, you know, reducing the quantity you have. A lot of times I find there's like especially in you know, growing up my mom, she had like a million different kitchen gadgets that were like she had a Kod stummer and she had an avocado slicer and all the sort of stuff, and it was like, you know, the simplicity of just, you know, reducing all of that to a few household kitchen nighted job is huge. So think a lot of people will get stuck on the like the efficiency of something of like Oh yeah, but this will like improve my life for like this fancy gadget one it's really just taking space up in your in your kitchen, which is again like feeding into this design industry idea that we need more space or we need to redesign something to fit more storage,...

...and it's like no, you just need to like get rid of the pizza cutter that you only use like five times a year or a bread maker something like that. So, yeah, there's the whole functionality side of a piece, or if it even has a function, if it's like totally functionalists functionless, then it's like, well, why are you keeping it? It's something less than its sentimental, and that's the hard part, I would say, because people do have the attachment to things of even if it's not even something that is super sentimental. But like, you know, letting go of, you know, five scissors, it's like, but I could, I could use one in every house or like, you know, the project or whatever your art supplies that you haven't touched in five years, and it's like but maybe one day I'll do art, and it's like yeah, people will hold on to that emotion, and so that's a lot of my thing too, is helping people out with that. One of the tips I would say is, like, just with anything, it's not going to get solved over night. So I would say, like even decluttering and stages, like you know, or focusing on one room, like okay, I'm going to tackle my kitchen, or in my kitchen specifically, I'm going to tackle like all of my kitchen gadgets and Gismos, or my class and I'm going to focus on all my clothing and it will kind of constantly be whittled down, because, I mean I've done this in my space to where it's like you'll get rid of maybe a decent pile the first time, but it's still not quite enough, and then you'll do like maybe a few more, few more, and to with getting rid of stuff, a lot of people do have a hard time letting go. So something that something that I suggest is, you know, giving it to someone that you know could benefit from it or just like if you're fine donating it to a first store, great, but a lot of people will find that, like if I'm the act of like gifting to a person is a lot better than just like putting it in the trash and like forget it. Like there's there's a different energy when it's like I know someone that could actually benefit from this item that I'm not personally using. Yeah, that's it. That's an interesting way to look at it. Actually it's I guess it's just more intentional person dropping it off and like a good will win. Yeah, and that's think a big focus online is like intentional, intentional living. Yeah, so what's really interesting? Okay, so I want more question for you on the suction. Yeah, probably the most important is, so how can you be reached for appointments and consultations? And Are you taking appointments and consultations now? Yeah, so I am currently accepting, you know, clients and consultations, because every client is is different, and one of the thing, this is a whole other misconcept, or not misconception, but something I'm trying to change, is like, you know, even though I said I'm based in Seattle, with with us, all kind of experiencing that, like, Hey, a lot of our work can be done online and virtual. You know, this is something that I really want to focus on too, because, since I do offer something that is so unique, I don't want it just to be limited to the city that I'm currently in, like I want to be able to help people transform their spaces and transform their lives anywhere throughout the world. So I that's, you know, something I'm focused on. So how that can go about is contacting me through my website, which is hunting them, HIVORYCOM, and there I list all my services out. I have packages for people that have a little more idea of maybe what they're looking for, but I also have my services and we can put together, you know, what's going to suit your needs best. So that, I say, that would be the easiest way to get ahold of me. And then, you know, if you aren't in my personal area and I can't physically drive to you, there are so many other ways we can, you know, go about communicating. I mean even right now, like you're in Canada and we're having a conversation via zoom. So there are things like that that, you know, we can work on. Yeah, for sure. Okay, yeah, I was going to ask about the online thing, but that's great, and then I'll link the website down below, just so much it's easy to click on and it's right there. So thank you so much for talking with me. This was a really great conversation. It was so interesting. I honestly really didn't think of how into your design can really affect our health or kind of affect our state of mind. So I think you found your your unique ability and being able to kind of merge those things and make it into something totally different. Oh, thank you so much. And and this is just awesome to be able to like,...

...you know, jump on here and talk about that, because, you know, growing up and always feeling this way. And, yeah, I don't think many people feel that. Or like once, I actually like, once you hear it, like yes, that makes sense, but like you have to have someone to actually explain it and, you know, show all these reasonings for the dots to connect. So if I'm the DOT connector, it's like great, because I do want to educate more people about how our spaces do impact us. Like I said, it's one of our basic needs, is like food and shelter, and our homes are our shelter. So, you know, of course they're going to impact us. Yeah, when I when I saw your tick talk, I'm like wow, this, this ceased to be heard. And thank you because, like I mean, I've been trying to, you know, get my voice out through social media right now, because that's kind of the only thing with us all being a lock down. But also, yeah, just wanting to do these drastic changes to our like my industry, and you know, the more like, the louder my voice can carry, the more people also like. I think one of the beautiful things as I've had so many people react and be like, oh my gosh, this is exactly what I want to do and like how are you doing this, or like I totally feel this way, and it's just so awesome to hear that other people are wanting to do this too, and it's like yes, because this needs to because this needs to happen. We need to like change these old ways of thinking about things. So it's cool that more people are wanting to do this to so I'm like, Yay, we're gonna, you know, change our homes for the better and our spaces really exactly will. I wish you the best of luck and thank you so much. Thank you so much, tiffany. Yeah, it was awesome to be on here. So, yeah, thank you again.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (4)